You get this much on Instagram:

But for the real primo material, try this VHD shaved full frontal

Quebec law stipulates that for a wagering contract to be valid, it must be related to activities “requiring only skill or bodily exertion on the part of the parties,” rather than to chance. Furthermore, the amount wagered must not be excessive. The court ruled that there was some skill in the game, but that half a million dollars was a bit excessive.

OK, it sounds like a ballsy bet, but it’s $517,000 in beaver bucks, not god-fearin’ greenbacks. How could that be excessive? Isn’t that like four muffins at Tim Hortons?

Kidding aside, it’s more than $350,000, even in real money.

Kaniehtiio Horn plays Tanis on Letterkenny, but she is pictured here from an episode of Hemlock Grove. You can find a .gif of the scene here.

Most recently, she removed her top in Possessor (2020), a sci-fi effort from Brandon Cronenberg, son of the noteworthy Canadian director David Cronenberg.

Previous:

Kaniehtiio was topless in Embrace of the Vampire (2013)

Kim Cattrall, 1979

I don’t know of any earlier topless shots, but she did a rear nude scene in a 1975 film called Rosebud. (Below. She’s the brunette on the right. She was 18 at the time.)


image host

You may never have heard of this film, but it had a notable cast: Peter O’Toole, Richard Attenborough and Peter Lawford starred, and former NY mayor John Lindsay appeared in his only movie role. The five young naked actresses, who played kidnap victims, were not well known at the time, but at least two of them went on to lengthy careers. In addition to Cattrall, French screen legend Isabelle Huppert bared her buns on the deck of the yacht.

The trailer (below) is immensely entertaining if for no other reason than its utter incompetence. How could the Academy have passed up Mayor Lindsay for an Oscar nod?


“You have now entered the jurisdiction of silly walks. Commence silly walking immediately. Follow @Yorkshire_Silly_Walks for highlights. Your walk may be posted! We’re all in this together so let’s have some fun while we can! (Don’t know how to silly walk? Google Monty Python Ministry of Silly Walks for inspiration.)”

Once again Brainscan takes a deep dive into a forgotten chapter in the history of film nudity: the grindhouse era. Brainscan alone created all the commentary and collages, as well as the film clips that accompany this article in the members’ version of the Fun House.

At the turn of the decade, from the 60’s to the 70’s, the production of gindhouse movies moved from mainly New York to mainly LA, and with that shift in geography came a shift in the actresses who starred in these films. The popular New York group included several women who were attractive enough, but not breath-taking.  Only Gigi Darlene stands out as truly beautiful.  The others, to borrow a line from the funniest Kiwis, would definitely be in the top three on the street … depending on the street.

June Roberts is a fave of mine, but she was not a classic beauty, as you can see in 1968’s Kitten in a Cage.

Linda Boyce in Kitten in a Cage,

in A Thousand Pleasures (also 1968)

and in Monique, My Love (1969) had, well, an interesting look,

as did Janet Banzet in Mini-Skirt Love (1967)

and The Ultimate Degenerate (1969),

but it was Jo Sweet in Monique, My Love who would attract the attention of most of us, were she to have wandered by.

Much the same thing – attractive but not extraordinary – can be said for

Elizabeth Knowles in Trader Hornee (1970)
and Just The Two of Us (1970)

and for Julie Conners in Trader Hornee

and in The Curious Female (1970),

whereas the real striking beauty in Curious Female was Charlene Jones, who had something of a career in TV for a while.

So, it was pretty common in a 1969 or 1970 grindhouse movie to have an actress or two who would stand out in the real world and another actress who would stand out even on the streets of Hollywood.  That’s what you get in Alice in Aliceland (1969)

 with Janice Kelly,

Julia Blackburn

and Sheri Jackson

and in Sweet Sickness (1968) with Vincene Wallace

and Marguerite Zalud.

All of this means the move to LA produced a shift toward glamour, along with a shift from topless to full frontal AND a shift from black and white to color.  To see that change  summed up in a pair of movies, take a look at

Rita Bennett in Vibrations (1968)

and Luanne Roberts in Sweet Trash (1970).

And the last trend of sorts to mention in these transition years was a move away from actresses pulled from the ranks of topless print models, such as Lillian Parker

She acted in in Obscene House (1969)

more Lillian Parker action with some unknowns

– a movie that has a boatload of unknown actresses with  made-up names,

to actresses, such as Georgina Spelvin

and Jennifer Welles in Career Bed (1969),

who would go on to do the hardcore thing.

Part 1 of this series, The Immoral Mr. Teas, can be found here

Part 2, Nudie Cuties and More, 1963-1965, can be found here.

Part 3, The Nudie Cuties of 1963, can be found here

Part 4, The First Nudie Musical, can be found here

Part 5, Early Nudie Costume Comedies, can be found here

Part 6, The Mid Sixties, can be found here

Part 7, 1967, can be found here.

to be continued …

 


 

If you enjoy Brainscan’s work, here are the other series that can be found on Other Crap:

The Films of Harry Novak

Part 1, The Sixties, can be found here.

Part 2, Hicksploitation, is here.

Part 3, The Seventies, is here.

Part 4, The Models in Print (and in his films), is here

 

The Early Years of Film Nudity

Part 1: 1932. Peak Pre-Code Talkies.

Part 2: 1929-1934. The Other Pre-Code Talkies.

Part 3: 1927. The Swan Song of the Silents.

Part 4: 1900-1926. The Silent Era.

Part 5: 1935-1951. The Dry Years.

Part 6: 1952-1959. Europe to the Rescue

The same articles, with the added bonus of all of Brainscan’s film clips,  can be found in the members’s version of the Fun House, along with the many thousands of other collages, clips and commentaries that Brainscan has created in the past two decades. (And his contributions represent only a tiny fraction of the content in the back issues, since the Fun House has been updated every day, seven days a week, without exception, for the past 24 years.)