If we were to give a lifetime achievement award for filmed nudity, who would be the very first recipient?

Winslet?

Connelly?

Kinski?

Bellucci?

Mirren?

Cotillard?

Green?

Moore?

Gemser?

Kidman?

Fenech?

Jolie?

Kristel?

Russ Meyer?

Jesus Franco?

Tinto Brass?

Uncle Scoopy?

other?’

Here is an interesting supplement to the discussion: “Actors And Actresses Who Spend The Most Screen Time Nude.” I have no idea whether it is accurate or who they chose to exclude. I take it that it’s just A-listers (or close), but in that case Emmanuelle Beart should qualify, as she spent more time naked in one film (La Belle Noiseuse) than any of those actresses have done in their entire careers. And how did Kate Winslet not make the list?

It’s not dead yet, but it’s about to go on the gurney when the “bring out your dead” guy arrives.

The Supremes have agreed to hear the discrimination suits against Harvard and UNC

“The advocates who first developed the Harvard and UNC lawsuits in 2014 aspired to an eventual battle at the Supreme Court, where affirmative action has been upheld only through fragile one-vote margins.”

Given the new roster on the court, I see no chance for affirmative action to survive. Those one-vote decisions belong to the past. Even Justice Roberts, who often sides with the liberals, has been an opponent of the practice. It’s not just the composition of the court that seems to doom affirmative action. There is also law and that pesky Constitution. I believe that affirmative action is good for society, but it’s difficult to find any legal basis for it.

Take note of these two points:

  • “Harvard argued that it considers race in a flexible way that benefits all highly qualified candidates. Its lawyers told the trial court that the college could fill its freshman class entirely with applicants who had perfect test scores and grades, but that it wanted a different mix on campus, a broader range of talent and life experiences.”
  • “The lower US courts that ruled for Harvard and the University of North Carolina in the dual-track cases, however, said the programs used race in a sufficiently limited way to fulfill compelling interests in diversity.”

You see what the Harvard defense and the lower court rulings have in common? They have absolutely no basis in law or the Constitution. They are based on social justice arguments rather than the actual pertinent law. What Harvard “wanted” is not the same as what Harvard must do under the law, and “compelling interests in diversity” is a social engineering argument, not a legal one.

On the other hand, the case against Harvard was brought under Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits schools receiving federal funds from discriminating based on race. The UNC lawsuit similarly claims Title VI grounds, as well as a violation of the 14th Amendment’s guarantee of equal protection of the law, which covers state institutions. Those are valid legal arguments. Justice Roberts himself famously declared, “The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.”

I have mixed feelings about this matter. I believe in the benefits of affirmative action, and even some of America’s prominent conservative voices have agreed with me, but its legal basis has always been tenuous at best, and I believe that the current conservative Supreme Court is highly unlikely to uphold it. If you’re a betting man, the over/under is that six judges will vote against Harvard and UNC.

It would probably be more accurate to say “new music is killing new music,” but …

“The 200 most popular new tracks now regularly account for less than 5 percent of total streams. That rate was twice as high just three years ago. Old songs now represent 70 percent of the U.S. music market. Even worse: The new-music market is actually shrinking.”

“The declining TV audience for the Grammy show underscores this shift. In 2021, viewership for the ceremony collapsed 53 percent from the previous year—from 18.7 million to 8.8 million. It was the least-watched Grammy broadcast of all time. A decade ago, 40 million people watched the Grammy Awards.”

Kay came very close to major stardom. She has a solid TV resumé, but never really got an important part in an acclaimed film. You know how it is in show biz. Some people get more of a career than they deserve, some get less. Kay probably deserved a little bit better than she got. You might say she is the poor man’s Diane Lane, a capable enough actress who also just happened to be a sexy woman with a good body.

She certainly got out of the gate quickly. She was only 19 when she landed her first big role, starring opposite Bill Holden in a film directed by Clint Eastwood. That’s some big time Hollywood, right there. Later in the 70’s she made some interesting films with stars like Lee Marvin and Oliver Reed, and she was always part of “the beautiful people” spotlight because of her marriage to teen idol David Cassidy. Unfortunately, none of her films were really big winners, either as commercial hits or critical successes, and by 1987-1988 she was reduced to doing grade-B films to keep her movie career alive.

But she is still working today, as she approaches 70. She’s no longer a star, but she’s working.

Captures from a new set of HD clips by the clip master, Aesthete.


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Most of the nudity was provided by Rebecca Louise in a flashback sequence.


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There is a skinny-dipping scene in which Rebecca Louise is naked with another actress. The closed-captioning identifies this character as “Lisa,” and IMDb says that Lisa was played by Anouk Samuel. While all of that makes sense, I can’t say for certain that the second woman is Anouk because the woman does not seem to be the same one pictured on her IMDb page. That could just be a hair-color issue (the character is a blonde, Anouk is not), and the ID may be correct, but don’t accept it as gospel for now.


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Our girl Sydney Sweeney was sexy, but not naked.


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