The pitch:

“The film tells an episode of the Battle of the Atlantic, when the Italian submarine Cappellini sunk the Belgian ship Kabalo, and Cappellini’s commander, Salvatore Todaro, decided to disobey orders by rescuing the Kabalo’s crew. This forced him to navigate on the surface for three days, making the ship an easy target for enemies.”


Silvia D’Amico

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Cecilia Bertozzi

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“Mameli, the boy who dreamed of Italy”

Italian miniseries limning the life of Goffredo Mameli, the poet who wrote the lyrics of “Il Canto degli Italiani,” literally “Song of the Italians,” Italy’s national anthem. He’s called a “boy” in the title because he never lived to celebrate his 22nd birthday.

Chiara plays one of Mameli’s loves.


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Curious about what her face looks like? Short answer: great. This was snapped two weeks ago.

All captures and comments by Whitecaps:

Captures from the film Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1080P)

Captures 11-14 are Rutanya Alda
captures 15-16 and 22-25 are I believe Elizabeth Dupeyrón
captures 31-33 are Rita Coolidge

I don’t know the rest

Very good movie, even if unfortunately overshadowed by its behind the scenes.’

At first, the movie likely generated interest for being Bob Dylan’s first feature film role. During the filming though it also took on more interest for director Sam Peckinpah being a completely out of control alcoholic who was so drunk he was only capable of filming for four hours a day. After the film was finished it generated more interest for being chopped up by the studio and it bombed at the box office.

In 1988 though Turner Classic Movies revived the film with a reedit that restored 16 minutes from the original theatrical release. Finally, this 2005 ‘Special Edition’ took out about six minutes but is said to be the closest to Peckinpah’s original vision.

The film itself is one of the attempts to deconstruct Western (and Western films) myths, along with films like (controversially) The Searchers and Clint Eastwood’s Unforgiven.

The film is based on the true story of lawman Pat Garrett and outlaw Billy the Kid. Without too many spoilers, the film shows the similarities of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid and the choices they made given the changing west in 1880. Essentially, big money was coming to New Mexico and the governor and the big money people thought that outlaws like Billy the Kid were giving the west a bad reputation that was chasing away additional investment.

Given this reality, the older former outlaw Pat Garrett decides out of self interest to join the system. The younger Billy the Kid decides to fight the big money rancher, but it’s also made clear that Billy the Kid is not some Robin Hood type looking out for the little people, but is also only concerned with his self interest.

Of course, the most evil person is the big moneyed powerful rancher and then probably the governor, but they’re too big for the law.

This is also the film where the Dylan song “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door” comes from. The Dylan songs in the film (there are really just three), a song played once in the film about Pat Garrett, a kind of balladeer song updated throughout the movie about Billy the Kid, and Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door. For anybody who wondered why Dylan seemed to be singing to his ‘momma’ in the song, it’s because the songs are literal and the character Dylan is singing to (on behalf of the sheriff played by Slim Pickens) is named Momma (Baker.)

In my opinion, this is one of the best scenes with a song in a movie ever.

Also, In my opinion, the Billy the Kid ballads are some of Dylan’s worst lyrics:

They say that Pat Garrett’s got your number
So sleep with one eye open when you slumber

I suspect this was intentional revenge from Dylan. Not only was Peckinpah drunk the whole time, he was, according to Dylan, dictatorial, filming in some isolated place in Mexico where he insisted the cast stay for the entire shoot.

Of course, the one thing I don’t get is that when Billy the Kid turned eighteen, shouldn’t he have changed his name to Billy the Adult? (1080P)

Captures 11-14 are Rutanya Alda
captures 15-16 and 22-25 are I believe Elizabeth Dupeyrón
captures 31-33 are Rita Coolidge

I don’t know the rest

Very good movie, even if unfortunately overshadowed by its behind the scenes.’

At first, the movie likely generated interest for being Bob Dylan’s first feature film role. During the filming though it also took on more interest for director Sam Peckinpah being a completely out of control alcoholic who was so drunk he was only capable of filming for four hours a day. After the film was finished it generated more interest for being chopped up by the studio and it bombed at the box office.

In 1988 Turner Classic Movies revived the film with a re-edit that restored 16 minutes from the original theatrical release. Finally, this 2005 ‘Special Edition’ took out about six minutes but is said to be the closest to Peckinpah’s original vision.

The film itself is one of the attempts to deconstruct Western (and Western films) myths, along with films like (controversially) The Searchers and Clint Eastwood’s Unforgiven.

The film is based on the true story of lawman Pat Garrett and outlaw Billy the Kid. Without too many spoilers, the film shows the similarities of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid and the choices they made given the changing west in 1880. Essentially, big money was coming to New Mexico and the governor and the big money people thought that outlaws like Billy the Kid were giving the west a bad reputation that was chasing away additional investment.

Given this reality, the older former outlaw Pat Garrett decides out of self interest to join the system. The younger Billy the Kid decides to fight the big money rancher, but it’s also made clear that Billy the Kid is not some Robin Hood type looking out for the little people, but is also only concerned with his self interest.

Of course, the most evil person is the big moneyed powerful rancher and then probably the governor, but they’re too big for the law.

This is also the film where the Dylan song “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door” comes from. The Dylan songs in the film (there are really just three): a song played once in the film about Pat Garrett, a kind of balladeer song updated throughout the movie about Billy the Kid, and Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door. For anybody who wondered why Dylan seemed to be singing to his ‘momma’ in the song, it’s because the songs are literal and the character Dylan is singing to (on behalf of the sheriff played by Slim Pickens) is named Momma (Baker.) In my opinion, this is one of the best scenes with a song in a movie ever.

Also, In my opinion, the Billy the Kid ballads are some of Dylan’s worst lyrics:

They say that Pat Garrett’s got your number
So sleep with one eye open when you slumber

I suspect this was intentional revenge from Dylan. Not only was Peckinpah drunk the whole time, he was, according to Dylan, dictatorial, filming in some isolated place in Mexico where he insisted the cast stay for the entire shoot.

Of course, the one thing I don’t get is that when Billy the Kid turned eighteen, shouldn’t he have changed his name to Billy the Adult?

——————-

Scoop’s note: to my knowledge, this film is the only place where you can see Rita Coolidge nudity.